How To Run Using Heart Rate Zones | Running Training For Triathlon

Published on March 23rd 2018

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Running well is not always about training hard, it’s about training smart. Using the heart rate zones in your triathlon training is a great way to tailor your plan. In this video, GTN explain how and when to train using heart rate, and the benefits it can bring to your running. Subscribe to GTN: http://gtn.io/SubscribetoGTN Check out the GTN Shop: http://gtn.io/8g ZONE 1 100-120bpm, 50-60% This is super easy, you'll hardly working and might well wonder why it’s even worth running at this pace. It’s a good idea to make this run social, you should feel like you’re out enjoying life and not training as it’s all about recovery and flushing your legs out. ZONE 2 120-140bpm, 60-70% We’re staying in the aerobic zone here, it’s moderately light training but a step up from zone 1. You’re building your aerobic base in this zone, this could be your long 1 hour run with a friend, holding a conversation is a good sign you’re working at the right level. ZONE 3 140-160bpm, 70-80% This is zone is used less commonly when training to HR but it’s the grey area that athletes often slip into as you’re not pushing up your lactate threshold but you’re working too hard to be purely building aerobic base. That said, your coach might set zone 3 work early on in your base training as it will help to build muscular endurance and can make your body more efficient. ZONE 4 160-180bpm, 80-90% This is where the hard work happens and it won’t feel comfortable. This training will improve your speed endurance and lactate tolerance as you’ll be close to, or in, your threshold zone throughout this effort. If you’re targeting sprint or Olympic you'll be running close to your race pace in these sessions. ZONE 5 Over 180 bpm, 90-100% You won’t be able to stay in this zone long as 90-100% of your max is over your lactate threshold and basically all out. Lactic acid will soon catch up with you and prevent your muscles from working in this zone very quickly. Note that in the lag time needed for your heart rate to reach your max, you're legs may well have failed you. If you liked this video and found it helpful then don't forget to give it a thumbs up and share it with your triathlon and running friends 👍 If you'd like to contribute captions and video info in your language, here's the link - http://gtn.io/8f Watch more on GTN... 📹 How To Train With A Heart Rate Monitor - http://gtn.io/RunHR 📹 How To Lose Weight Through Triathlon - http://gtn.io/LoseWeight Music: Epidemic Sound Xilo - vvano Dubstep Mammoth 2 - Cecilia Lindh Photos: © Triathlon / Getty Images